Category: Digital Humanities

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Scholarships/Fellowships

From CUNY Academic Commons



General DH

  • Twitter has emerged as the key platform for communication among digital humanists. See DH on Twitter, DH Now in Journals, and Tips.
  • DHAnswers (@dhanswers on Twitter) is a Q&A board collaboratively run by the Association for Computers and the Humanities (ACH) and the Chronicle of Higher Education’s ProfHacker. Users post their questions (big and small), and the questions are tweeted to the DH community, who come to the board to provide answers. It is already becoming, as the repository of answers builds, a rich source of DH expertise – as well as a space for sustained conversation among those in the field.
  • HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory, pron. “haystack”), “a network of individuals and institutions inspired by the possibilities that new technologies offer us for shaping how we learn, teach, communicate, create, and organize our local and global communities.” Site hosts competitions, projects, discussion, news and events information, member blogs. Led by Cathy Davidson and team at Duke University. See also HASTAC scholars in Scholarships/Fellowships.
  • Humanist, an email listserv that has been running since 1987, under the stewardship of Willard McCarty at King’s College London: “an international electronic seminar on the application of computers to the humanities. Its primary aim is to provide a forum for discussion of intellectual, scholarly, pedagogical, and social issues and for exchange of information among members.” Note that this is a somewhat formal environment, with distinguished participants. Archives are available via the Humanist site.
  • NEW! DHCommons, “a hub for people and organizations to find projects to work with, and for projects to find collaborators” – otherwise known as “a match.com for DHers.”
  • NEW! MLA Commons will likely become an important space for DHers. See the Digital Humanities group there.
  • Arts-humanities.net, based at King’s College London, is similar to HASTAC, but with an emphasis on UK/European work. It also includes a library (containing, for instance, interviews from DH2010), an extensive bibliography, listing of tools, and a taxonomy of humanities computing methods.
  • There is also a Digital Humanities Zotero group that collaboratively produces a shared Zotero library.
  • Decoding the Digital Humanities, an informal meet-up (in the pub) to discuss readings and share ideas with others in the Digital Humanities. Founded by University College London’s Centre for Digital Humanities, they now have chapters around the world.
  • Not specific to DH: The Academic Commons – aims to enable faculty, academic technologists, librarians, administrators, and others to “share knowledge, develop collaborations, and evaluate and disseminate digital tools and innovative practices for teaching and learning with technology” in the context of liberal arts education. Sponsored by the Center of Inquiry in the Liberal Arts at Wabash College.
  • Likewise not specific to DH, but related: H-NET, “an international interdisciplinary organization of scholars and teachers dedicated to developing the enormous educational potential of the Internet and the World Wide Web.” Run by MATRIX at Michigan State University.

Area/Discipline-Specific

Readers, please help build out this section! Some examples:

  • NINES (Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-Century Electronic Scholarship) “is a scholarly organization devoted to forging links between the material archive of the nineteenth century and the digital research environment of the twenty-first.”
  • Digital Americanists (@DigAmericanists) – “a scholarly society dedicated to the study of American literature and digital media.”

@CUNY


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Training/Professional Development

 

From CUNY Academic Commons

 

@CUNY

 

Readers, do you know of any DH-related courses at local universities that would be of interest to CUNY graduate students? If so, please include them here.

 


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Conferences & Events

 

From CUNY Academic Commons

 

See also the various institutes in Training/Professional Development.

For more, watch:

@CUNY

  • The annual CUNY IT Conference, held in December each year, offers DHers opportunities to present and learn about new applications of technology to research and pedagogy. Follow our blog for updates.
  • The Digital Studies Seminar meets throughout the year with invited speakers, sponsored by the Center for the Humanities. Topics have included the preservation of born digital literary texts, the philosophy of free software, internet surveillance and privacy, and teaching interactive technology and pedagogy to doctoral students. Our blog will provide the schedule.
  • And of course the CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative hosts speakers too; follow our blog for news about upcoming events.

 


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Journals

From CUNY Academic Commons



DH Journals

Most active journals (currently) are listed first.

  • Digital Humanities Now was launched in November 2009, and instantly became essential reading for DHers. Now relaunched as a PressForward publication, it automatically collates and curates links to news items, blog posts, etc. shared on Twitter by people in the DH community. Read more about the editorial process here.
  • NEW! The Journal of Digital Humanities, another PressForward publication, presents peer-reviewed and edited pieces that were originally selected for inclusion in the Editors’ Choice section of Digital Humanities Now. Appears quarterly.
  • Literary & Linguistic Computing (LLC), a traditional pay-for-access journal that has been published quarterly since 1986. It is a publication of the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO), see Organizations/Associations. Here it is at Mina Rees.
  • Digital Humanities Quarterly (DHQ) – an open-access, peer-reviewed online journal that was launched in 2007. It is also a publication of the ADHO, and is affiliated with LLC above.
  • Digital Studies / Le Champ Numérique – an open-access, peer reviewed online journal based at the University of Victoria, Canada. It is a publication of the Canadian association SD/SEMI (see see Organizations/Associations).
  • The International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing (formerly History and Computing) is published approximately once per year by the Edinburgh University Press, and sponsored by The International Association for History and Computing, the Electronic Cultural Atlas Initiative at UC Berkeley, and Digital Resources in the Humanities and Arts (DRHA, a UK-based conference).
  • Vectors – an “investigation at the intersection of technology and culture”; peer-reviewed, publishes only works that require multimedia forms: “In so doing, we aim to explore the immersive and experiential dimensions of emerging scholarly vernaculars across media platforms.”
  • TEXT Technology; the journal of computer text processing has been dormant since 2007, but has strong work in its archives (see for example the combustible penultimate issue).

Other Journals

  • First Monday – First Monday was one of the first openly accessible, peer–reviewed journals on the web, and is devoted to study of the Internet. It has appeared since May 1996 on the first Monday of every month. Although its scope is much broader than DH, it publishes many articles that are germane to the field.
  • Kairos – an open-access, refereed online journal exploring the intersections of rhetoric, technology, and pedagogy; publishes bi-annually, in August and January, with occasional special issues in May.

@CUNY


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Blogs to Follow

From CUNY Academic Commons



Bloggers

A brief selection of assorted bloggers. Note that not all of the bloggers listed here necessarily identify as digital humanists – but all have views to share that are important to the field. Readers, please help us build out this list, by discipline/area of focus.

Blogs for Centers/Institutions

See Centers for DH Work for details.

@CUNY

CUNY DHers, please add your blogs here!


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DH on Twitter

From CUNY Academic Commons


Being on Twitter, even if only as a follower, is essential for keeping up with the field. DHers use Twitter for information-sharing, discussion, and community-building, and it is a key component of DHNow (@dhnow; see Journals) and DHAnswers (@dhanswers; see Online Communities/Discussion Forums).

If you are new to Twitter, see Tips for information that will help you get started.

Note, however, that use of Twitter is not without controversy within the field, and not only between tweeters and non-tweeters – see Bethany Nowviskie’s “uninvited guests: regarding twitter at invitation-only academic events” and, of course, the comments section of her post.

@cunydhi

We have our own Twitter account @cunydhi. Please follow us for news on CUNY DHI activities and events. We use the hashtag #cunydhi to mark DHI-related tweets; search Twitter for #cunydhi to see what we’ve been up to.

#hashtags

Communities also self-organize around hashtags. See for instance #transformdh, #altac (formerly known as #alt-ac), and #dhdebates.

Twitter Lists of DHers

Twitter provides the ability to compile lists of users to follow. See for instance:

Readers, please help build out this section!


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Online Communities/Discussion Forums

From CUNY Academic Commons



General DH

  • Twitter has emerged as the key platform for communication among digital humanists. See DH on Twitter, DH Now in Journals, and Tips.
  • DHAnswers (@dhanswers on Twitter) is a Q&A board collaboratively run by the Association for Computers and the Humanities (ACH) and the Chronicle of Higher Education’s ProfHacker. Users post their questions (big and small), and the questions are tweeted to the DH community, who come to the board to provide answers. It is already becoming, as the repository of answers builds, a rich source of DH expertise – as well as a space for sustained conversation among those in the field.
  • HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory, pron. “haystack”), “a network of individuals and institutions inspired by the possibilities that new technologies offer us for shaping how we learn, teach, communicate, create, and organize our local and global communities.” Site hosts competitions, projects, discussion, news and events information, member blogs. Led by Cathy Davidson and team at Duke University. See also HASTAC scholars in Scholarships/Fellowships.
  • Humanist, an email listserv that has been running since 1987, under the stewardship of Willard McCarty at King’s College London: “an international electronic seminar on the application of computers to the humanities. Its primary aim is to provide a forum for discussion of intellectual, scholarly, pedagogical, and social issues and for exchange of information among members.” Note that this is a somewhat formal environment, with distinguished participants. Archives are available via the Humanist site.
  • NEW! DHCommons, “a hub for people and organizations to find projects to work with, and for projects to find collaborators” – otherwise known as “a match.com for DHers.”
  • NEW! MLA Commons will likely become an important space for DHers. See the Digital Humanities group there.
  • Arts-humanities.net, based at King’s College London, is similar to HASTAC, but with an emphasis on UK/European work. It also includes a library (containing, for instance, interviews from DH2010), an extensive bibliography, listing of tools, and a taxonomy of humanities computing methods.
  • There is also a Digital Humanities Zotero group that collaboratively produces a shared Zotero library.
  • Decoding the Digital Humanities, an informal meet-up (in the pub) to discuss readings and share ideas with others in the Digital Humanities. Founded by University College London’s Centre for Digital Humanities, they now have chapters around the world.
  • Not specific to DH: The Academic Commons – aims to enable faculty, academic technologists, librarians, administrators, and others to “share knowledge, develop collaborations, and evaluate and disseminate digital tools and innovative practices for teaching and learning with technology” in the context of liberal arts education. Sponsored by the Center of Inquiry in the Liberal Arts at Wabash College.
  • Likewise not specific to DH, but related: H-NET, “an international interdisciplinary organization of scholars and teachers dedicated to developing the enormous educational potential of the Internet and the World Wide Web.” Run by MATRIX at Michigan State University.

Area/Discipline-Specific

Readers, please help build out this section! Some examples:

  • NINES (Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-Century Electronic Scholarship) “is a scholarly organization devoted to forging links between the material archive of the nineteenth century and the digital research environment of the twenty-first.”
  • Digital Americanists (@DigAmericanists) – “a scholarly society dedicated to the study of American literature and digital media.”

@CUNY


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Hot Topics

 

From CUNY Academic Commons

 

Here are a few entry points to ongoing – often heated – debates in the field. What topics would you add? What other readings would you recommend to someone new to DH?

The Digital Humanities and the Humanities

The annual MLA Convention seems to provoke intense discussion of the relationship between the Humanities and the Digital Humanities, often focused by coverage in the Chronicle of Higher Education. Articles are below, with responses. Be sure to read the comments too.

MLA 2009:
William Pannapacker announces the “arrival” of DH.

MLA 2011:
Pannapacker’s review finds DH triumphant, but dominated by an in-group/out-group mentality – DH has its “stars,” DH itself is the “cool kids’ table.”

MLA 2012:
The fireworks this time are brought by Stanley Fish, no less.

See also John Unsworth’s “The State of Digital Humanities, 2010,” June 2010, and Ian Bogost’s more recent take, “Beyond the Elbow-Patched Playground,” August 23-25, 2011.

Marking the Field (Turf Wars?)

There are tensions within the field too – see the above posts, and the many Definitions of DH. As Whittney Trettien puts it: “Who can claim to be a digital humanist? Do you have to have a PhD? How much coding do you have to know? Are humanities bloggers and twitterers participating in e-scholarship? At the root of it all: how do we (or do we not) want to delimit our community?”

A Culture of Making, and Its Implications

Many DHers subscribe to a project-based, build-something mentality that has been summarized as “more hack, less yack,” or “less talk, more grok” – see for instance, THATCamp, and One Week | One Tool. The emphasis is on teamwork and collaboration versus the “lone scholar” model. But it also raises a range of questions: do digital humanists need coding skills? How do all members of the team get the recognition they deserve (and need to prove their worth to their employers)? How can we promote openness in our making practices? Is making in tension with thinking?

To Code or Not to Code – A Canard?

Collaboration and Participation:

Thinking and Making:

Calls to Action

Melissa Terras’s address has been widely acclaimed; the Manifestos have received more uneven endorsement. Bethany Nowviskie summons us to reform graduate education, and Lisa Spiro issues a call for the DH community to create an open, distributed certificate program in the digital humanities. Alan Liu challenges DH to be more critically engaged with our culture, and to take a leadership role in advocating for the humanities. Jim Groom’s post – a vision of open education more generally – is straight from the heart and, for CUNYites, an anthem.

 


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Some Reading

From CUNY Academic Commons


These texts provide an introduction to the field and its main preoccupations. See also the selections in Hot Topics.

Several presses now offer relevant series, including:


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Sample Projects

From CUNY Academic Commons


Here are just a few examples of Digital Humanities work to give a sense of its range. What other projects would you want to show to a beginning DHer?

Advocacy

  • 4Humanities, a site created by the international community of DH scholars and educators to assist in advocating for the humanities. Provides a communication platform, tools, and resources. “The humanities are in trouble today, and digital methods have an important role to play in effectively showing the public why the humanities need to be part of any vision of a future society.”

The Archive, Digital Preservation of Analog & Born-Digital Materials

Digital Fabrication/Making Things

Networked Pedagogy

  • Looking for Whitman – an experiment in multi-campus digital pedagogy funded by the NEH’s Office of Digital Humanities, LFW used open-source tools to connect classrooms in multiple institutions, creating a dynamic, social, collaborative learning environment; students at New York City College of Technology (CUNY), New York University, University of Mary Washington, and Rutgers University-Camden shared their intellectual experiences of exploring Whitman’s work in relationship to specific places in which Whitman lived, with students from Novi-Sad in Serbia adding a global perspective.
  • Not specific to DH but an important related movement in Educational Technology are projects that provide open platforms for teaching, learning and collaboration, such as University of Mary Washington Blogs. CUNY is a leader in this space, with the ePortfolio Gateway and Macaulay Social Network at CUNY’s Macaulay Honors College, Blogs@Baruch at CUNY’s Baruch College, and now the OpenLab at City Tech.

Scholarly Communication & Publishing

Text/Data Mining, Analysis & Visualization

@CUNY

In addition to the major initiatives listed under Networked Pedagogy and Scholarly Communication above:

CUNY DHers, please add your projects to this list!


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