Category: NCC

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NCC Summer Bridge Brainstorming

From CUNY Academic Commons

Here are some of my ideas in response to the four learning goals.

Overall, I expect that the ways we can best serve these students in the Summer Bridge Program is to provide a unique opportunity for students to make a “fresh start.” This should not be a continuation of the high school experience; rather a new commitment is made. Students can define and or redefine what academic success is for them and determine how their definitions, goals and expectations, align with the New Community College experience.

The New Community College Summer Bridge mission should be very specific and all the students should be able to easily articulate the mission and why they have enrolled. The reason why I say this is because I strongly believe there are some things that we can not ensure and teach. I am speaking specifically to “willingness.” Let’s not spread ourselves too thin to think that all the students are going to grab a hold on to everything but the experience should be engaging and the learning goals should be transparent, and achievable. If a student can listen and follow instructions they should achieve some level of merit or success for the day. Too often we are looking at the exceptional student and his/her achievements and not enough on the student who follows “the plan.” The Summer Bridge Program should if nothing else has a daily set of performance tasks that we can evaluate and measure based on “the plan”.

More importantly, the Summer Bridge experience should provide the professors with insight into the students overall needs and who the “First Year Students” are. It assists the professors in designing and/or revising their curricular goals. It would be really great if the students receive a “progress note” at the end of the program which specifically addresses that his/her learning goals and achievements. The students should leave knowing their academic challenges/and or areas of improvement. This is simply honest communications about where they are academically and where we “think” they are socially, and emotionally. If there are areas of weakness, it will provide them with a list of things they can do or places they can go for the support they need. And lastly, the letter should also end hopefully about what that student can look forward to starting in September and speak to their individual potential.

I envision the students gathering together each morning as a “Summer Bridge Assembly” before instruction begins and there is a focus for the day. These should be theme based and very affirming. In order to promote newness perhaps we look to incorporating some traditional aspects of college life. For example, students will learn and sing a school alma mater and recite a school mantra. My main point is too looking at bringing about a ritual so that we set a tone for learning. Again, these are my thoughts to steer away from the “high school experience.” These assemblies can include inspiring guest speakers who are a part of the New York City work force. For instance, it could be a sanitation worker, a firefighter, a nurse, etc, a talent producer. These people should tell their stories; maybe they were a first generation college student. Maybe they had struggles that they overcame in education that they could share with the students. In some way, this could rejuvenate the students and keep them inspired to achieve their goals and encourage them to take risks. Each day the students are given an opportunity to rededicate themselves to learning in a brand new way. Summer Bridge should challenge the students to think about their future critically and at the same time realize what is possible.

It came up in our initial discussion about the placement tests or a diagnostic assessments I agree we need to assess the student’s individual skills assessing their math skills, reading and writing skills, and along with that I’d like to propose we include an academic self-perception test. I am thinking about a rubric of sorts to assess how they see themselves as learners. The questions on the rubric should address and include their individual needs and societal pressures they feel will greatly impact their academic success. This could include finances, relationships, living conditions, resources i.e. computers, printers, etc. While it is very important that we are transparent with the goals and expectations of the summer and beyond, it is also equally important for college faculty to listen to the students and their goals and expectations, difficulties and/or excitements. Establishing healthy communications is extremely important to helping the students distinguish between co-dependency and interdependency in a collegiate environment.

Once this assessment or diagnostic test is evaluated the students should separated into smaller cohorts and meet and be assigned to a faculty advisor. The groupings of students should really be mixed so that the students are in a position to become peer advocates. At the moment, I will refer to these groups “Discovery Groups”. These “Discovery Groups” these groups should meet twice a day once in morning and the afternoons to talk about the discoveries made throughout the day. This can be the “safe place” where the students learn about their academic resources (as outlined in goals. Here they can familiarize themselves with the meta-learning processes and begin to explore and identify their learning styles and multiple intelligence. Perhaps this group they will need to fulfill an academic requirement and achieve a long-term planning goal. The “Discover Group” could also be “Book Club” where they are reading a novel and discussing it. The novel could really be selected according to level of difficulty and subject matter that might relate to this group.

The required reading, writing, and research skills necessary to succeed in this Summer Bridge Program should be interconnected and related to their final project. Each day the students the students should be given a set of tasks that they must meet individually and collectively. I envision this as a cross-curricular collaborative assignment that ties in the relevant topics as they relate to New York City. Some of the topics that might be explored are: historic neighborhoods and communities, the New Harlem or Artist Renaissances happening across boroughs, gentrification and entrepreneurship to name a few, and the green projects the ones in particular that focus on rerouting traffic and city parks and community gardens, and trend setting in an Urban Environment.

These topics seem to lend themselves to some exciting off-site research and on-going assessment, perhaps interviews and meetings with perhaps (CUNY Alumnae) and local government offices. My hope is the research and writing and reading are relevant to their lives and livelihood as it pertains to the New City College mission, curricular goals and objectives. This is where I believe learning will be fun, informative, and transformative. Somehow, I’d like the students to incorporate the math skills necessary to present their ideas and in some cases use empirical data to argue their point of view. I feel that this assignment could be reviewed by a panel of faculty members and that professors teach a skill-building class or skill-sets that must be included in the research criterion. This is again offers the students some opportunity to incorporate technological skills within their presentational skills in addition to them writing and submitting their final papers.

NCC CCE Notes

From CUNY Academic Commons

Center for College Effectiveness Committee
Brainstorming Notes
Friday, January 15, 2010

Considers Middle States frameworks – a starting point
Conditions that bring on or create effectiveness
Two purposes [for the CCE] – accountability and improvement – our work needs to scope out both
Planning, accountability, reporting
Creates a strategic planning direction
Measures against mission and clearly defined goals
Real measures – with clarity about what they really say
Should improve student learning
Doesn’t become a distraction to the central work
Gets links back into the goals of the NCC
Review of fixed indicators, there is a need for research as well
Builds measures into the learning system
A consultant who understands how the organization functions and improves it
The independent eye
CCE to be seen as a partner
Seeks to be the best friend of everyone on campus – faculty, staff, students, alumni, public
Helps other functions at the NCC thrive
Supportive role – the brain and the bridge
Present around campus
Present on campus
The centipede
You want others to want the CCE to be at the table
Recognizes that different parts on the NCC will have different needs
In its most effective mode it intersects at many points
Low to the ground, the focus should be to serve everyone as well as senior management
There is a need to have low-stakes information reporting, if everything is high-stakes no will use the center as a resource for improvement
Needs low-stakes measures
Gives the stakeholders the skills to give meaning and purpose to information
Not just measuring it; but helping to improve it; using what you discover
Creating real-time data that drives decision-making
Takes place at many different levels: institutional, program and others
Understands that different parts [of the NCC] will have different needs
CCE helps people use the information; facilitates understanding
Understands effectiveness at different levels – students and employees
Thinks outside the box

PMP
Development of the framework; subjective (analytical?) and benchmark measures
Danger of becoming a slave to the numbers; can create a distortive effect – desire to manipulate

Research Questions
What happens after graduates leave?
To what extent can the NCC create stickiness? The ability to remain in contact with students after they leave. Students identify themselves with the NCC.

NCC First Year Learning Outcomes

From CUNY Academic Commons

Draft: Learning Assessment in the first year

First Semester: A case study project (with 4 assessments):

1) Select and describe a paradigmatic instance or contemporary case that addresses an issue within one of the city seminar’s overarching themes: public health in NYC, urban education, environmental science, business administration. The description will provide a narrative overview, including the following:

  • The history of the issue and a depiction of the specific example,
  • an overview of institutions and organizations involved, and
  • a biography of some of the actors involved in the case.

Ex: Public Health: STDs in NYC, the smoking ban, improving the quality of food in the public schools, H1N1 vaccination, etc.

2) Explore the case

  • Public documents, including ______ and financial statements.
  • Multiple perspectives on the case
  • Interviews with institutional and local players.
  • The outcome.

3) Evaluate the Outcome

4) Reflect on the Learning Process

Second Semester: Thinking in the disciplines (4 assessments)

NCC: Learning Goals and Benchmarks

From CUNY Academic Commons

Student Learning Goals:
1) Students will develop a basic understanding of the central questions / ways of knowing of two or three areas of study.

2)  Students will analyze various city-based case studies.

3) Students will articulate an informed decision about their choice of a college major and their career aspirations.

4) Students will develop an understanding of their role as ethical and civil actors with responsibilities in their communities.

Learning Outcomes for the City Seminar (what we had been calling “benchmarks”)

Students will complete one “genre-based” project at the end of each semester that demonstrates their growing understanding of a field of study:

(Possible Projects / “Genres” that represent college-level learning)

  1. Community Needs Assessment: local neighborhood
  2. Public Service Announcement (audio, visual, story-boarding…)
  3. Theatre/Film/Arts Review
  4. Visual Mapping of Institutions/Fields/Actors: Students will be able to create a model of professions and present a map (visual representation) depicting the relationships between institutions and actors.
  5. Annotated Bibliography and Decimal Outline
  6. Political Speech: for a city or state official
  7. Technology Review
  8. Lesson Plan
  9. Funding Proposal
  10. Lab Report
  11. Researched Paper
  12. Oral Presentation

Project design will increase in complexity as the year progresses.  For example, early projects will support the development of skill in reading, paraphrasing, summarizing and interpreting, comparing and contrasting academic and trade texts.  Later projects will build on these skills and require students to engage in more research and to become proficient in locating, evaluating and citing sources.

Projects can be mapped onto a single college credit or a # of credits (e.g. one project = 2 credits), with the potential application to various Gen Ed fields. For example, a student creating a health class lesson plan might represent learning in the social sciences writ large; whereas, a lesson plan around NYC water quality would equate with the natural sciences. With guidance from faculty, students would pursue projects across the 3 general areas: humanities, social sciences, physical & life sciences. Moreover, students would have to demonstrate a mix of communications skills: written, oral, visual. The objectives are loosely arranged above to demonstrate a progression of skills, although students may choose to complete projects in different order across the 2 semesters.

Learning Outcomes for Professional Studies

  1. Workplace ethnography: an exploration of the culture and activities of a NYC workplace.
  2. Selecting a major: a presentation comparing several fields of study and arguing for the selection of a major. 
    a.   Students will be able to identify the relationships between how knowledge is organized and the world of work.
    b.   Students will create a schema (frame of reference) about a discipline or body of knowledge and be able to use their schema when organizing knowledge and thinking about how to apply it to professional settings.

Components of the City Seminar & Professional Studies
1) Each module/block is built around a case study, whereby students will learn and apply the tools associated with areas of study to explore all aspects of a case.

2) When exploring cases, students will be able to obtain relevant information to make an informed decision about the case. 
     a. Develop skills to gather, assess and analyze data

     b. Distinguish between fact and opinion and learn to evaluate research and literature.

     c. Develop skills to annotate research studies

     d. Apply quantitative reasoning skills around a specific case study in the area of budget, workload, statistical   

     information, etc. and report the results in writing and/or presentations

     e. Use data to crate a project (speech, report, outline, group project, PSA, lesson plan, proposal etc.) 

3) Students will create an e-portfolio to show their collection of projects to demonstrate their progression in intellectual and practical skills.

4) Students will use e-portfolio projects to see decision points throughout their college careers and reflect on how they have changed.

NCC Building Knowledge Goals and Benchmarks

From CUNY Academic Commons

Learning Goal Benchmark       Comptencies  
1. Students discover, gather, organize, summarize information and develop questions in a field Create a portfolio: select an issue within an occupation or field of study and develop a point of view about it based on information collected. Include an interview, budget data, organizational structure ….

a. Use a variety of resources — library, internet, academic, popular, experiential — to gather information on a topic

b. In working with resources gathered (as in “a” above), develop a variety of strategies for making “stuff” into personally useful information — annotating texts, taking notes, creating mind maps and outlines             

c. Based on “personally useful information (as in “b” above, do the following —

  • make decisions about relevance of information
  • draw relationships between ideas across different sources,
  • put ideas in own words,
  • use quotations and paraphrases effectively,
  • cite sources appropriately
  • use rhetorical skills to create a presentation with audience in mind
2. Students develop and apply questions to new bodies of knowledge Do a task (needs def) that demonstrates ways of thinking and approaches used in a particular field and includes student reflection
3. Students develop a question and design how to investigate it Write a paper that describes two majors and compares structures and work place mentalities of the professions within the two fields. Project identification of self on both professions and evaluate one’s own skills, interests and aptitudes relevant to the majors and professions


NCC Assessment & Portfolios Resource Page

From CUNY Academic Commons

Educause: Demonstrating and Assessing Student Learning with E-Portfolios

The “Sticky” ePortfolio System by Ali Jafari

Backwards Design (Edutech Wiki)

Five Dimensions Of Good Assessment By Linda Suskie

The Limitations of Portfolios By Richard J. Shavelson, Steven Klein, Roger Benjamin(Inside Higher Ed. 10/16/09)

Conflicting Paradigms in e-Portfolio Approaches By Helen Barrett and Judy Wilkerson (2004)

Using e-Portfolios For Classroom Assessment By Helen Barrett (Oct. 2006)

Helen Barrett Blog

Virtual Assessment Center

National Institute For Learning Outcomes Assessment

Where is The Student Voice In Assessment?

NCC Assessment & Portfolios Articles/Current Events

From CUNY Academic Commons

Educause: Demonstrating and Assessing Student Learning with E-Portfolios

The “Sticky” ePortfolio System by Ali Jafari

Backwards Design (Edutech Wiki)

Five Dimensions Of Good Assessment By Linda Suskie

The Limitations of Portfolios By Richard J. Shavelson, Steven Klein, Roger Benjamin(Inside Higher Ed. 10/16/09)

Conflicting Paradigms in e-Portfolio Approaches By Helen Barrett and Judy Wilkerson (2004)

Using e-Portfolios For Classroom Assessment By Helen Barrett (Oct. 2006)

Helen Barrett Blog

Virtual Assessment Center

National Institute For Learning Outcomes Assessment

Where is The Student Voice In Assessment?

NCC E&PM Working Committee

From CUNY Academic Commons

Welcome to the Enrollment & Persistence Management Wiki! This is the collaborative workspace that we will be using to share information outside of the meeting environment.

                                                                   TABLE OF CONTENTS

NCC Assessment & Portfolios


From CUNY Academic Commons

                                                            TABLE OF CONTENTS

Welcome to the NCC Assessment & Portfolios Committee Wiki Pages

Assumptions & Values (from 10/20/2009 meeting)

Definitions of Assessment and Portfolios  (added 10/26)

Portfolio Models In Higher Education

Assessment Models (other)

Articles & Other Resources