Category: Digital Humanities

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DH Syllabi

From CUNY Academic Commons



DH Programs

The following institutions have DH MA programs. (For more details, see Miriam Posner’s list).

  • King’s College London
  • Loyola University Chicago
  • University of Alberta
  • University College London
  • University College Cork

Tanya Clement has collected a list of Digital Humanities Inflected Undergraduate Programs as of 2009 with additions in the comments. This post also has useful links to discussions about DH education.

The Zotero group “Digital Humanities Education,” launched by Lisa Spiro, is collaboratively building a library that “includes syllabi and curriculum planning documents, as well as articles about open education, networked pedagogies, and more.” This will be an invaluable resource for the DH community, and much more comprehensive than what we offer here.

DH-related syllabi

The number of DH courses has grown exponentially in recent semesters. Instead of updating individual syllabus links, we are keeping the previous list below, and directing researchers instead to collections like these.

A brief selection of DH-related syllabi.
To submit syllabi for this list, please use this form.

Undergraduate syllabi

2008

  • Sample, Mark. George Mason University, Fall 2008. ENGL 343: “Textual Media”; syllabus

2009

  • Hirsch, Brett D. University of Victoria, Winter 2009. HUMA 250: “Digital Representation and Creation in a Humanities Context.” course website

2010

  • Davidson, Cathy. Duke University, Spring 2010, ISIS 120S-01/English 173S-05: “This is Your Brain on the Internet” syllabus
  • Fitzpatrick, Kathleen. Pomona College, Spring 2010. Media Studies 168: “Writing Machines” syllabus
  • Harris, Katherine D. San Jose State University, Fall 2010. English 190 Honors Colloquium: “Digital Literature: The Death of Print Culture?”; syllabus
  • McClurken, Jeff. University of Mary Washington, Spring 2010. HIST4713C: “Adventures in Digital History” syllabus
  • Schlitz, Stephanie. Bloomsburg University, Fall 2010. “Digital Humanities: Transforming Through Technology”; [link needed]
  • Timney, Meagan. University of Victoria, Fall 2010. HUMA 150: “Tools, Techniques, and Culture of the Digital Humanities” (based on an earlier course developed by Brett D. Hirsch); course website; syllabus

2011

  • Brown, Jim. Wayne State University, Winter 2011. English 5992: “New Media And The Futures Of Writing” syllabus
  • Croxall, Brian. Emory University, Fall 2011. English 389, “Introduction to Digital Humanities” syllabus ; website
  • Clement, Tanya. University of Texas at Austin. Fall 2011. INF 385t, “Introduction to the Digital Humanities” course site ; syllabus
  • Davidson, Cathy. Spring 2011. English 90: “Industrial Origins of the Digital Age” course description
  • Fyfe, Paul. Florida State University, Fall 2011. ENG 5933-03, Introduction to the Digital Humanities draft syllabus
  • Owens, Trevor. American University, Spring 2011. HIST 377/677: “History in the Digital Age” syllabus
  • Rieder, David M. and Brock, Kevin. North Carolina State University, Fall 2011. IP 295: “Introduction to Humanities Physical Computing” syllabus
  • Theibault, John. Stockton College, Spring 2011. GAH 3223: “Introduction to Digital Humanities” syllabus

2012

  • Cordell, Ryan. St. Norbert’s College, January 2012. GENS 410: “Technologies of Text” draft syllabus
  • Ullyot, Michael. University of Calgary, Winter 2012. ENGL 203, “Hamlet in the Humanities Lab” description

Graduate syllabi

2009

2010

  • Brier, Stephen and Gold, Matthew K. CUNY Graduate Center, Spring 2010. ITCP 70020: “Interactive Technology and the University”; syllabus
  • Parry, Dave. University of Texas at Dallas, Spring 2010. EMAC 6361: “After/Print” course website
  • Petrik, Paula. George Mason University, Spring 2010. HIST 697: “History & New Media” course website
  • Smulyan, Susan. Brown University, Spring 2010. AMCV220: “Digital Scholarship” course website; syllabus

2011

  • Rieder, David M. North Carolina State University: Fall 2011, ENG 798 / ENG 583, “Introduction to Humanities Physical Computing” syllabus
  • Sinclair, Stéfan. McGill University: Fall 2011, LLCU-602: “Digital Humanities: New Approaches to Scholarship” syllabus

2012

  • Brier, Steve and Gold, Matthew K., CUNY Graduate Center, Spring 2012. MALS 78100: “Digital Humanities in Research and Teaching” course site
  • Presner, Todd. UCLA, Winter 2012. DH 201/Comp Lit 290 Graduate Seminar: “Introduction to Digital Humanities: Humanistic Knowledge, Disciplines, and Institutions in the 21st Century” syllabus

Professional Development

There is an emerging push for DH courses aimed at providing skills training for those who are already working in the field, or would like to join it. The skills that should be required of DHers, though, is a topic of some contention.


Previous: Tools & Methods     CUNY DHI Resource Guide Home Next: Jobs

Want to make a suggestion or correction? Please visit Using This Guide for more information.

DH Programs and Syllabi

From CUNY Academic Commons



DH Programs

The following institutions have DH MA programs. (For more details, see Miriam Posner’s list).

  • King’s College London
  • Loyola University Chicago
  • University of Alberta
  • University College London
  • University College Cork

Tanya Clement has collected a list of Digital Humanities Inflected Undergraduate Programs as of 2009 with additions in the comments. This post also has useful links to discussions about DH education.

The Zotero group “Digital Humanities Education,” launched by Lisa Spiro, is collaboratively building a library that “includes syllabi and curriculum planning documents, as well as articles about open education, networked pedagogies, and more.” This will be an invaluable resource for the DH community, and much more comprehensive than what we offer here.

DH-related syllabi

The number of DH courses has grown exponentially in recent semesters. Instead of updating individual syllabus links, we are keeping the previous list below, and directing researchers instead to collections like these.

A brief selection of DH-related syllabi.
To submit syllabi for this list, please use this form.

Undergraduate syllabi

2008

  • Sample, Mark. George Mason University, Fall 2008. ENGL 343: “Textual Media”; syllabus

2009

  • Hirsch, Brett D. University of Victoria, Winter 2009. HUMA 250: “Digital Representation and Creation in a Humanities Context.” course website

2010

  • Davidson, Cathy. Duke University, Spring 2010, ISIS 120S-01/English 173S-05: “This is Your Brain on the Internet” syllabus
  • Fitzpatrick, Kathleen. Pomona College, Spring 2010. Media Studies 168: “Writing Machines” syllabus
  • Harris, Katherine D. San Jose State University, Fall 2010. English 190 Honors Colloquium: “Digital Literature: The Death of Print Culture?”; syllabus
  • McClurken, Jeff. University of Mary Washington, Spring 2010. HIST4713C: “Adventures in Digital History” syllabus
  • Schlitz, Stephanie. Bloomsburg University, Fall 2010. “Digital Humanities: Transforming Through Technology”; [link needed]
  • Timney, Meagan. University of Victoria, Fall 2010. HUMA 150: “Tools, Techniques, and Culture of the Digital Humanities” (based on an earlier course developed by Brett D. Hirsch); course website; syllabus

2011

  • Brown, Jim. Wayne State University, Winter 2011. English 5992: “New Media And The Futures Of Writing” syllabus
  • Croxall, Brian. Emory University, Fall 2011. English 389, “Introduction to Digital Humanities” syllabus ; website
  • Clement, Tanya. University of Texas at Austin. Fall 2011. INF 385t, “Introduction to the Digital Humanities” course site ; syllabus
  • Davidson, Cathy. Spring 2011. English 90: “Industrial Origins of the Digital Age” course description
  • Fyfe, Paul. Florida State University, Fall 2011. ENG 5933-03, Introduction to the Digital Humanities draft syllabus
  • Owens, Trevor. American University, Spring 2011. HIST 377/677: “History in the Digital Age” syllabus
  • Rieder, David M. and Brock, Kevin. North Carolina State University, Fall 2011. IP 295: “Introduction to Humanities Physical Computing” syllabus
  • Theibault, John. Stockton College, Spring 2011. GAH 3223: “Introduction to Digital Humanities” syllabus

2012

  • Cordell, Ryan. St. Norbert’s College, January 2012. GENS 410: “Technologies of Text” draft syllabus
  • Ullyot, Michael. University of Calgary, Winter 2012. ENGL 203, “Hamlet in the Humanities Lab” description

Graduate syllabi

2009

2010

  • Brier, Stephen and Gold, Matthew K. CUNY Graduate Center, Spring 2010. ITCP 70020: “Interactive Technology and the University”; syllabus
  • Parry, Dave. University of Texas at Dallas, Spring 2010. EMAC 6361: “After/Print” course website
  • Petrik, Paula. George Mason University, Spring 2010. HIST 697: “History & New Media” course website
  • Smulyan, Susan. Brown University, Spring 2010. AMCV220: “Digital Scholarship” course website; syllabus

2011

  • Rieder, David M. North Carolina State University: Fall 2011, ENG 798 / ENG 583, “Introduction to Humanities Physical Computing” syllabus
  • Sinclair, Stéfan. McGill University: Fall 2011, LLCU-602: “Digital Humanities: New Approaches to Scholarship” syllabus

2012

  • Brier, Steve and Gold, Matthew K., CUNY Graduate Center, Spring 2012. MALS 78100: “Digital Humanities in Research and Teaching” course site
  • Presner, Todd. UCLA, Winter 2012. DH 201/Comp Lit 290 Graduate Seminar: “Introduction to Digital Humanities: Humanistic Knowledge, Disciplines, and Institutions in the 21st Century” syllabus

Professional Development

There is an emerging push for DH courses aimed at providing skills training for those who are already working in the field, or would like to join it. The skills that should be required of DHers, though, is a topic of some contention.


Previous: Tools & Methods     CUNY DHI Resource Guide Home Next: Jobs

Want to make a suggestion or correction? Please visit Using This Guide for more information.

Using This Guide

From CUNY Academic Commons


The guide is not designed to be comprehensive, but to provide key information for colleagues entering the field, and a useful quick reference.

The current state, though, is just a starting point – for instance, it does not contain any information for specific disciplines or research areas/methods (e.g. history, text mining, data visualization).

So, what would you like to see here? Please contribute your additions, corrections and/or suggestions by whatever means works best for you:

  • Editing the wiki directly (note that only Commons users can edit the wiki; see the FAQ for help on doing this; note too that, for now, rich text editing has been disabled, and needs to remain so; please remember to preview the page before you save!)
  • Tagging items on delicious with cunydhi
  • Via Twitter @cunydhi
  • E-mailing your comments to cunydhi@gc.cuny.edu

Some editing guidelines:

  • Please point to existing information, rather than duplicating it.
  • We would prefer the guide to be (lightly) annotated, rather than a list of links – feel free to provide commentary that adds value (keep the beginning DHer in mind).

All, please forgive any errors/omissions/infelicities – if you can’t correct the content yourself, do let us know and we will happily fix it for you!


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Organizations/Associations

From CUNY Academic Commons



For Individuals

For Institutions/Centers

  • centerNet: International network of DH centers, with more than 200 members. “Initiatives include developing cooperative opportunities for centers, advocacy for center funding and initiatives, and creating exchange and research opportunities for scholars and students.”
  • Project Bamboo: “a multi-institutional, interdisciplinary, and inter-organizational effort that brings together researchers in arts and humanities, computer scientists, information scientists, librarians, and campus information technologists to tackle the question: How can we advance arts and humanities research through the development of shared technology services?”
  • centerNet, the ADHO, Project Bamboo, arts-humanities.net and others are collaborating to form the Coalition of Humanities and Arts Infrastructures and Networks (CHAIN): “the aim of CHAIN is to support and promote the use of digital technologies in research in the arts and humanities.”
  • The National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE) “helps liberal arts colleges and universities integrate inquiry, pedagogy, and technology.” Has recently launched its own Digital Humanities Initiative.


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Want to make a suggestion or correction? Please visit Using This Guide for more information.

Tips

 

From CUNY Academic Commons

Getting Started

Practicalities

 


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Jobs

From CUNY Academic Commons


In addition to the usual sources (the MLA, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Inside Higher Education, etc.):

Readers, do you have other suggestions of sources for job information?


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Want to make a suggestion or correction? Please visit Using This Guide for more information.

Tools & Methods

 

From CUNY Academic Commons

 

General suggestions and curated lists

Readers, please help us build out these sections by recommending particular tools and methods that you have found useful, by discipline/problem domain.

Geospatial and mapping

  • ArcGIS is proprietary GIS (Geographic Information Systems) platform made by Esri.
  • GIS (QGIS) is an open source geographic information system. CUNY graduate students, faculty, and staff are eligible to register for Francis Donnelly’s Introduction to GIS Using Open Source Software Practicum and Spatial Databases Practicum.
  • Mapbox is a popular set of tools for building interactive maps.
  • Worldmap is an open source mapping platform developed by Harvard’s Center for Geographic Analysis. Its About page stresses the goal to “fill a growing niche between powerful desktop-bound mapping applications, and lightweight web map solutions with limited capacity.”
  • HyperCities is a research platform developed by UCLA for visualizing both space and time.
  • Neatline is a set of plugins used with Omeka designed to visualize narratives of space, time, and objects.

 

Data visualization

 

3D modeling and fabrication

Text mining and analysis

 

Digital publishing

  • Scalar is a scholarly publishing platform built by The Alliance for Networking Visual Culture.

 

Tutorials and Learning to code

 

Data sharing

 

Working with images

  • An overview of Organizing Image Collections for Research can be found on this Digital Fellows handout.
  • Name Changer (Mac only) or similar tools will quickly batch rename or append filenames on a large number of images.
  • Preview can quickly batch resize a large number of images. This can also be done in Mac Automator.
  • To view the EXIF metadata of any photograph, drop the photo or its URL into an EXIF data viewer such as [exifdata.com. exifdata.com].
  • For a high volume of data storage, use an external hard drive and/or cloud storage. See the this Digital Fellows handout for a comparison of cloud storage options.

 


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Want to make a suggestion or correction? Please visit Using This Guide for more information.

Centers for DH Work

From CUNY Academic Commons



Local-ish

Others

See the listing of DH centers maintained by centerNet. Here, though, are some other key centers to know:

@CUNY

  • CUNY Graduate Center is an important hub for digital work at CUNY – see its newly-launched website for Digital Initiatives.
  • A key resource is the CUNY Graduate Center New Media Lab, which works with Graduate Center and CUNY faculty and doctoral students to conceive and create multimedia projects. “Our goal is to integrate digital media into traditional academic practice, challenging scholars to develop fresh questions in their respective fields using the tools of new technology.” The New Media Lab is supervised by the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning, housed at the CUNY Graduate Center, which has done innovative work at the intersection of technology, historical scholarship, and education since 1981.


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Funding/Awards/Competitions

 

From CUNY Academic Commons

 

 


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Want to make a suggestion or correction? Please visit Using This Guide for more information.