Category: Teaching and Learning with Technology

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Educational Wikis

From CUNY Academic Commons

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7 Things You Should Know About Wikis This article explains how students–and faculty–can use wikis to collaborate on.

Using Wikis as Collaborative Writing Tools This webtext focuses on the use of wiki as a tool for writing and for teaching writing. (by Susan Loudermilk Garza and Tommy Hern)

Teaching and learning online with wikis from the conference proceedings of the ASCILITE (Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education) in 2004. Pretty basic and focused on online teaching, but a good overview (it’s early–2004 is a long, long time ago in internet time).

Wikis and Wikipedia as a Teaching Tool From the International Journal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning. Very comprehensive, and includes both wikipedia and using your own wikis in class. And also provides a good overview of other research.

50 Ways to use wikis Great suggestions on how to use wikis in the classroom.

Three Wiki Uses The author breaks wiki use down into three general categories: knowlege repositories, collaborative writing and situation awareness.

Using Group Wikis Online Bill Ashton, from York College, posts an in-depth presentation about using group wikis online on one of his blogs on the Commons, Things I say to my BlackBoard students. Also included in Bill’s June, 2012 post are links to his group wiki grading rubrics and a screencast overview of wikis in Blackboard.

Related Pages


SPS Faculty and Course Development Program- Constructive Conversation III

From CUNY Academic Commons

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Constructive Conversations Part II New Faculty Orientation to Online Instruction:

Post Semester Assessment, Review, and Revisions

This session will cover a variety of topics including:

• Student Assessment of the Course- within the class

• Student Assessment of the Course- conducted by the program

• Instructor Assessment of the Course

• Instructor – Mentor Discussions on Course Revision

• Instructor Assessment of Support needed for Course Revisions

• Instructor Assessment of the Virtual Mentoring Program

Review of checklists from the SUNY Student Learning Network as a guide for post semester review.

ONLINE COURSE REVIEW CHECKLIST

Review Your Course

Evolve: Evaluate Review and Revise your online course

New Faculty Course Review: Review and Revise

ONLINE COURSE REVIEW CHECKLIST used by mentors/observers in the SUNY SLN

Return to SPS Faculty and Course Development Program [1]

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SPS Faculty and Course Development Program- Constructive Conversation II

From CUNY Academic Commons

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Constructive Conversations Part II New Faculty Orientation to Online Instruction:

Contents

This session will cover a variety of topics including:

· Interactions with Learners

· Engaging the Learners

· How to connect with students who disappear.

· Managing the Workload

· Managing Discussion Boards

· Preparing for Course Assessments

· Preparing for Course Revisions

Next session in will focus on Post Semester Assessment, Review, and Revisions

Interactions with Learners

INSIDE of the COURSE SITE

  Voice Announcements
  Video Announcements
  Text Announcements
  Ask the Professor Feature
  Blogs
  Journals
  Discussions
  Assessments
  Feedback on Student Work and Progress
  Class Twitter

  Social Networks- FACEBOOK

  Early Warning Alerts
  Accept Student Feedback/ Assessment of Instructor

           -Course Design

           –Course Management

           –Course Content

OUTSIDE of the COURSE SITE

1. Email-Outreach

2. Text

3. Audio

4. Video

5. Email-Response

6. Telephone-Invited/Uninvited

7. Skype

8. Office Visit-Real or Virtual

9. Attend Program Receptions for Students


Engaging the Learners

Developing reciprocity and cooperation among students: principle (2) Arthur W. Chickering and Zelda F. Gamson (1987) “Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education” American Association of Higher Education Bulletin pp.3-7

Forms of Interaction: Student -Student

INSIDE of the COURSE SITE

  Student Introductions Space and Time
  Chat Room available throughout the course
  Discussions
  Participant
  Student Lead Discussions
  Student Facilitators-Course Facilitators or Course Wizards- Supplemental Instructors
  Group Work

   Wiki

  Mentors
  Tutors
  Class as a Learning Community in each course a community of inquiry in collaborative pursuit            and offering mutual support
 

OUTSIDE of the COURSE SITE

  •   Social Networks
  •   e-portfolio
  •   Virtual Campus
  •   IM
  •    Blackboard IM
  •   Email-text, audio, video
  •   Telephone
  •    FieldTrips

How to connect with students who disappear

· Direct Communications – Email – Telephone – Blackboard IM/Pronto—Skype

· Through Advisors

· Through Other Students

To Offer Innovative Measures to assist students in resuming their course work

Managing the Workload

Monitor time spent on tasks to determine where time is spent

Plan on managment techniques to arrive at a sustainable level after several semesters-100-133% of standard course time
Archive work with students that might be used again
Utilize rubrics for assessments
Utilize boilerplate/template feedback for assignments

Managing Discussion Boards

There are a variety of modes for constructing, monitoring and managing discussions.

Instructors can take any one of a number of roles within the discussions depending on the course design:

· Active participant

· Occassional participant

· Non-Participant

Combinations of the possibilities can also be employed as the instructor’s role might differ with discussions involving the whole class as opposed to groups or at the beginning of the semester as opposed to the latter parts.

Preparing for Course Assessments

At mid term and at semester end perform Course Assessment

Students should provide feedback on the course design, management and content
Students may be asked for feedback on the pace of the activities, the reasonableness of the due dates and work load
Students should provide feedback on the instructor’s role, presence and helpfulness
Students should have an opportunity to provide suggestions for revisions

Preparing for Course Revisions -a continuing process of revision

Instructor should have notes on or a plan for revisions of the course and course site based on assessments performed by the instructor and the students.

Instructors might make use of mentors and colleagues in the development of their plans for revisions and actual revisions

Return to SPS Faculty and Course Development Program [1]

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SPS Faculty and Course Development Program- Constructive Conversation I

From CUNY Academic Commons

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Constructive Conversations Part I New Faculty Orientation to Online Instruction:

                              Standards, Expectations and Community

Contents

                                             AGENDA


Welcome & Introductions

Academic Issues

• Online Instruction:

• Basic objectives, design and management

• “Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education”


Academic Integrity: Policy, procedures and contacts

Faculty Support

Program Contacts

Technical Support

Library Support

Email support

Advisement

Faculty Handbook

Student Support Services

Materials:

Enhancing Online Learning

Seven Principles for Effective Teaching

Top Ten Mistakes in Course Design

Course Teaching Strategies

Standards for Teaching and Learning Online

Sample Form for Observation of Online Faculty by Peer in an SPS Online Degree Program

Useful Checklist for Course Design and Management

SPS Academic Policies

Online Course Design

Helpful Hints and BB8 oddities for faculty course developers

Video of sample SPS Online Blackboard Course Site

Student Online Learning Preparedness Training at QCC, CUNY

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SPS Guidelines for the Design of Online Courses

From CUNY Academic Commons

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SPS Guidelines for the Design of Online Courses

Use this guide as you develop and assess your online course. This guide includes information about course structure, course activities, and assessment. Also available are resources for course design, including information about ADA compliance and resources for teaching and learning with technology. A downloadable PDF version can be accessed HERE.

SPS GUIDELINES FOR THE DESIGN OF ONLINE COURSES

 COURSE STRUCTURE

COMMENTS/SUGGESTIONS
MAIN PAGE

  √  

Banner

Banner is attractive and colorful.

Banner includes the course number & name.

Course Menu/Navigation Bar

Categories are logical & easy to understand.

All buttons are active.

Examples of categories include: Course Introduction; Instructor; Assignments; External Links; other Blackboard defaults as needed (buttons can be renamed).

Announcements

Welcome message; for development site, create a placeholder for later entry by each instructor).

Getting Started

Clear instructions for students at the beginning of the semester; tell them how and where to begin in the course.

CONTENT

Course Introduction & Course Documents

Syllabus includes: course name & number; prerequisites; official course description; learning objectives (6-10); textbook information; course schedule; grading scheme; course policies.

Course policy statements include: Academic Integrity; Netiquette; Participation; Accessibility for Students with Special Learning Needs; late assignments; extra credit.

Link or url provided for SPS Student Services (http://sps.cuny.edu/student_resources/index.html).

Course Modules/Units

All materials for each module/unit are organized within a folder. (Weekly folders strongly recommended).

Each folder is labeled with a title & beginning/end dates.

Module/unit titles correspond to main topics & learning objectives in syllabus.

Organization & content of units/modules is consistent across course.

Each module/unit includes a brief overview and/or learning objectives (can be inside folder or on outside).

Each module/unit clearly states important assignments and due dates.

Staff Information

Includes contact information, short professional biography & photo.

External Links

External Links are logically organized; if a significant number of links provided, they should be organized into clearly labeled folders.

External Links are used to connect students to tutorials for specialized software, statistical packages, and other tools needed for assignments and projects

Design


Consistent use of fonts & colors.

Color, graphics & icons are used to guide student users through content and/or highlight key concepts & relationships.

Course site is free of typographical, grammatical & other errors.

Navigation

Course navigation mechanisms are logical and efficient; in general, no more than three “clicks” should be required to locate materials; where more are needed, consider creating an interactive syllabus.

All course materials are easy for students to locate.

With-in course links are used to connect resources needed for specific assignments.

 COURSE ACTIVITIES

Assignments

Most assignments are complex, engaging and require that students add, integrate & synthesize knowledge.

Assignments are clearly aligned with and supportive of course learning objectives.

Assignments are introduced and provide clear directions for students.

Assignments are reasonable in terms of level of difficulty and time required in comparison to time allotted.

A variety of different types of assignments are used.

Assignments include both those to be completed by individual students & several that require group work.

Assignments promote learning of foundation skills (writing, quantitative reasoning, problem solving) as well as content mastery.

Mechanisms for asking questions the instructor questions about the assignment always are provided.

Interactivity

A section “Getting to Know You” is provided at the beginning of the semester in which students can introduce themselves to one another and to the instructor; the instructor adds their own introduction. (For development site, create placeholder.)

Assignments include frequent opportunities/requirements for interaction between students, including use of: blogs, wikis, threaded discussions, group/team projects.

Discussion questions and group projects are complex, require critical thinking and problem-solving, and offer the possibility of many different answers and/or approaches.

Clear statements of expectations and rules for engaging in discussions & group projects are provided, including guidelines for active listening and civility.

Where possible and logically appropriate, discussions & group projects are tied to authentic, realistic questions & tasks, including those that might be encountered in the professional workplace.

ASSESSMENT

Course Objectives

All course learning objectives are measurable.

All assessment activities address achievement of learning objectives.

Types of Assessment


Assessment activities include regular opportunities for “low stakes” assessment, e.g., reflection exercises, self-assessment, progress reports, questions about concepts.

Assessment activities are varied in format and responsive to different types of learners and dimensions of performance.

Mastery of learning is assessed frequently, with timely & informative feedback from the instructor.

Opportunities are provided for students to give feedback on other students’ work, with clear guidelines provided.

All “high stakes” assessments are announced at the beginning of the course, with schedule & grade weighting specified.

Grading

The point value or grading plan for each assignment is clearly specified.

Weighting of assignments & tests is proportional to their importance in the context of course learning objectives.

Grading rubrics are available to students for all major assignments.

Grade Center

Grade Center is set up at the beginning of the semester & includes all major assignments and tests.

Assessment of Course by Students

Students are given opportunities to provide feedback to the instructor about the course, within the course itself.

RESOURCES FOR COURSE DEVELOPERS

Resources for Teaching/ Learning with Technology

https://commons.gc.cuny.edu/wiki/index.php/Resources_for_Teaching_and_Learning_with_Technology

California State University at Chico

http://www.csuchico.edu/tlp/resources/rubric/rubric.pdf

Florida Gulf Coast University

http://www.fgcu.edu/onlinedesign/designDev.html

ADA Compliance

https://commons.gc.cuny.edu/wiki/index.php/Universal_Design_and_Access_(ADA)

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE PDF VERSION

School of Professional Studies Faculty and Course Development Program

From CUNY Academic Commons

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Contents

Mission

The mission of the Office of Faculty Development and Instructional Technology is to provide faculty with the support and training that they require at all stages in their careers; to enhance the community of practice in order to promote greater teaching effectiveness, instructional innovation and faculty satisfaction; all with the goal of improving the quality of the student learning experience.

Strategies

  • Align faculty development and instructional technology efforts with SPS program and instructional goals and initiatives for greater relevance and focus
  • Enlist the expertise of experienced faculty to help create and conduct faculty development activities and solicit the views of a broad range of faculty in formulating new or improving existing activities
  • Build a systematized and well-articulated network of faculty development that will result in the better integration of skills, knowledge and competencies
  • Offer a wide range of different activities, approaches and perspectives that can appeal to faculty at every stage in their teaching careers, whether teaching online, hybrid courses or face-to-face
  • Provide diverse delivery formats such as online faculty development and self-paced materials as well as f2f and one-on-one support so as to make it easier for all faculty to participate
  • Provide rigorous and engaging faculty development targeted to the special demands of online and hybrid teaching as well as for those using instructional technology to complement their face-to-face teaching
  • Structure faculty development activities in such a way as to promote sharing in a community of practice along with self-reflection
  • Emphasize practical application and readily implementable changes as a result of all faculty development activities
  • Promote best practices and highlight research findings that are relevant to teaching and learning and encourage faculty engagement in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, especially in regard to the use of technology in teaching
  • Continually assess the value and quality of all faculty development activities through various methods of analysis, including evaluation by faculty participants

To contact the Office of Faculty Development and Instructional Technology at ofdit@sps.cuny.edu

Current and Upcoming Programs

Certification Program for Teaching Online and Hybrid Courses

Preparation for Teaching Online: A Foundational Workshop for CUNY Faculty

Our newly redesigned 2-week workshop for new or new-to-online CUNY faculty preparing to teach online or hybrid courses was launched in January 2012. CUNY faculty must have permission from academic supervisors to attend this completely online and instructor-led training experience. Sessions are planned for at least three times per year.

The workshop models effective design and facilitation skills and addresses design issues, pedagogical approaches to teaching online and hybrid courses, as well as organization and management of an online class. It also provides an opportunity for faculty to become familiar with the environment of the Blackboard LMS from both a student and instructor perspective. For more information, here is the website describing this workshop and the scheduled sessions for the year ahead https://cunyonline.commons.gc.cuny.edu/.

Self-paced Technology Training

School of Professional Studies faculty desiring to learn new Blackboard skills or to review selected features and functions can access our new Self-paced Technology Training course site on Blackboard. The link will appear as “Self-paced Faculty Training“ when you log into Blackboard, under the My Organizations section.

This Blackboard site contains materials and resources that you can use on your own to refresh or learn new Blackboard or other technology skills. There are resources in different formats—step by step guides, short video tutorials, and podcasts. There is an area to pose any questions you might have and you can subscribe to the Q& A area as well so you will know when a question or response has been posted. Sylvie Richards and our talented Instructional Technology Fellows will be monitoring the area to answer your questions. So this is a dynamic area, and we welcome your suggestions about improving existing materials or adding new resources you feel would be most helpful. We will continue to add to this area, so we hope you will check back from time to time and see what we have to offer.

New to the School of Professional Studies and not yet on Blackboard? Check out our video tutorials and handouts providing an overview of Blackboard– http://sps.cuny.edu/ofdit/tutorials/

Faculty Development Day, for All SPS Faculty

Each year we offer a faculty development day for all SPS faculty to attend. Hold the date of March 30th 2012 for the 2012 faculty development workshop event organized around the themes of writing across the curriculum and using technology to promote writing (including how to design assignments using blogs and wikis). This event is for all SPS faculty, whether teaching face-to-face, online or hybrid courses. There will also be an opportunity for a hands-on lab to introduce Blackboard 9. Faculty will be welcome to attend one or more of the sessions during the day. Watch for our future email announcements with more detailed information in coming months. For those who cannot join us, we expect to offer at least a portion of the curriculum in a future online workshop.

Online, Asynchronous Workshops

Beginning in late spring 2011, we will be rolling out new instructor-facilitated workshops each semester, delivered online and asynchronously. These focused professional development workshops will provide an opportunity to explore various pedagogical and technology-related topics in the atmosphere of a faculty learning community. These workshops will typically be offered twice per year and in multiple sections, based on demand.

Ongoing, Technology Training Sessions—Online, Synchronous (Real-time)

These ongoing training sessions are offered by Sylvie Richards and our Instructional Technology Fellows. If you are on Blackboard, you should be receiving periodic emails about upcoming sessions. If you did not previously receive our calendar, a copy of the latest schedule as well as contact information and schedules for our staff is posted in the Self-paced Faculty Training classroom on Blackboard, described on this OFDIT website.
For those of you who are interested in a topic but unable to participate at a particular scheduled time, one-on-one sessions are also available upon request. You may also arrange for an in-person session. Contact Sylvie Richards or any of the Instructional Technology Fellows to make arrangements.

Consultations

SPS faculty may contact OFDIT director, Susan Ko, Susan.Ko@mail.cuny.edu to schedule an individual consultation on course design and teaching issues.

Faculty Peer Mentoring program

A newly constituted mentoring program for new faculty piloted in early 2012. Designed for online teaching faculty, faculty peer mentoring provides one-on-one support to new faculty for an entire semester from a faculty member with experience teaching for SPS. It provides for contact on an as-needed basis but also sets up a series of scheduled interactions for key points in the semester.

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On Pedagogy Course Management Engaging Students

From CUNY Academic Commons

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Course Management  Engaging Students

A principle of effective instruction is to engage the learners. There are numerous ways in which this can be attempted as part of the basic instructional design of a course. Some are to be described here.

Student Led Discussions

Explanation: Many have described the use of Student Led Discussion. One proponent is Dr. William Pelz of SUNY.

Resources: How to prepare for and lead discussion. How to teach a course in student-led discussion format. A User’s Manual for Student-Led Discussion by Gale Rhodes and Robert Schaible, Professor of Arts and Humanities, Lewiston-Auburn College http://spdbv.vital-it.ch/TheMolecularLevel/StdLedDisc.html

Cutting the cord: student-led discussion groups in higher education by John Kremer, (The School of Psychology, The Queen’s University of Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland), Carol McGuinness, (The School of Psychology, The Queen’s University of Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=837524&show=abstract

Example– in Philosophy Classes of Dr. Philip A. Pecorino, CUNY, Queensborough Communty College , School of Professional Studies

This is placed at the end of the set of discussions in each module of the course

Module#   Student Led Discussion

Each of you are to submit a new thread with your own discussion topic related to this module of this class. You are to moderate the discussion. Read the following material, if you have not already done so, about student led discussions. It is part of the course information documents under course outline. http://www.qcc.cuny.edu/SocialSciences/ppecorino/SS610/outline-student-lead-discussions.html You are responsible to post and moderate. You are not responsible if others do not respond to your post. When posting make sure you make the SUBJECT line clear. Do not leave it blank. Do not put your name in the subject area

Reflections on Learning

Explanation: Reflection on what one has learned and on the content of instruction are powerful activities supportign and deepening learning and supporting learner motivation.

Resources:

Learning Through Reflection http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/development/reflection.html Hatton & Smith (1995) identified four essential issues concerning reflection: Hatton, N., Smith, D. (1995). Reflection in Teacher Education: Towards Definition and Implementation. The University of Sydney: School of Teaching and Curriculum Studies WWW: http://www2.edfac.usyd.edu.au/LocalResource/Study1/hattonart.html

• We should learn to frame and reframe complex or ambiguous problems, test out various interpretations, and then modify our actions consequently.

• Our thoughts should be extended and systematic by looking back upon our actions some time after they have taken place.

• Certain activities labeled as reflective, such as the use of journals or group discussions following practical experiences, are often not directed towards the solution of specific problems. • We should consciously account for the wider historic, cultural, and political values or beliefs in framing practical problems to arrive at a solution. This is often identified as critical reflection . However, the term critical reflection, like reflection itself, appears to be used loosely, some taking it to mean no more than constructive self-criticism of one’s actions with a view to improvement.

Reflection http://www.intime.uni.edu/model/learning/refl.html

Example-in Philosophy Classes of Dr. Philip A. Pecorino, CUNY, Queensborough Communty College , School of Professional Studies

This is placed at the end of each module as the last discsussion forum

What have the materials and exercises of this module meant to you? How does anything relate to your life? Has your thinking about anything changed in any way? If so, how? If so , why?

Return to Course Management
HOME | Teaching and Learning with Technology )

On Pedagogy Course Management Engaing Students

From CUNY Academic Commons

Image:Teachingandlearning.jpg

A principle of effective instruction is to engage the learners. There are numerous ways in which this can be attempted as part of the basic instructional design of a course. Some are to be described here.

Student Led Discussions

Explanation: Many have described the use of Student Led Discussion. One proponent is Dr. William Pelz of SUNY.

Resources: How to prepare for and lead discussion. How to teach a course in student-led discussion format. A User’s Manual for Student-Led Discussion by Gale Rhodes and Robert Schaible, Professor of Arts and Humanities, Lewiston-Auburn College http://spdbv.vital-it.ch/TheMolecularLevel/StdLedDisc.html

Cutting the cord: student-led discussion groups in higher education by John Kremer, (The School of Psychology, The Queen’s University of Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland), Carol McGuinness, (The School of Psychology, The Queen’s University of Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=837524&show=abstract

Example– in Philosophy Classes of Dr. Philip A. Pecorino, CUNY, Queensborough Communty College , School of Professional Studies

This is placed at the end of the set of discussions in each module of the course

Module#   Student Led Discussion

Each of you are to submit a new thread with your own discussion topic related to this module of this class. You are to moderate the discussion. Read the following material, if you have not already done so, about student led discussions. It is part of the course information documents under course outline. http://www.qcc.cuny.edu/SocialSciences/ppecorino/SS610/outline-student-lead-discussions.html You are responsible to post and moderate. You are not responsible if others do not respond to your post. When posting make sure you make the SUBJECT line clear. Do not leave it blank. Do not put your name in the subject area

Reflections on Learning

Explanation: Reflection on what one has learned and on the content of instruction are powerful activities supportign and deepening learning and supporting learner motivation.

Resources:

Learning Through Reflection http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/development/reflection.html Hatton & Smith (1995) identified four essential issues concerning reflection: Hatton, N., Smith, D. (1995). Reflection in Teacher Education: Towards Definition and Implementation. The University of Sydney: School of Teaching and Curriculum Studies WWW: http://www2.edfac.usyd.edu.au/LocalResource/Study1/hattonart.html

• We should learn to frame and reframe complex or ambiguous problems, test out various interpretations, and then modify our actions consequently.

• Our thoughts should be extended and systematic by looking back upon our actions some time after they have taken place.

• Certain activities labeled as reflective, such as the use of journals or group discussions following practical experiences, are often not directed towards the solution of specific problems. • We should consciously account for the wider historic, cultural, and political values or beliefs in framing practical problems to arrive at a solution. This is often identified as critical reflection . However, the term critical reflection, like reflection itself, appears to be used loosely, some taking it to mean no more than constructive self-criticism of one’s actions with a view to improvement.

Reflection http://www.intime.uni.edu/model/learning/refl.html

Example-in Philosophy Classes of Dr. Philip A. Pecorino, CUNY, Queensborough Communty College , School of Professional Studies

This is placed at the end of each module as the last discsussion forum

What have the materials and exercises of this module meant to you? How does anything relate to your life? Has your thinking about anything changed in any way? If so, how? If so , why?

Return to Course Management
HOME | Teaching and Learning with Technology )

Constructive Conversation III

From CUNY Academic Commons

Image:Teachingandlearning.jpg

Constructive Conversations Part II New Faculty Orientation to Online Instruction:

Post Semester Assessment, Review, and Revisions

This session will cover a variety of topics including:

• Student Assessment of the Course- within the class

• Student Assessment of the Course- conducted by the program

• Instructor Assessment of the Course

• Instructor – Mentor Discussions on Course Revision

• Instructor Assessment of Support needed for Course Revisions

• Instructor Assessment of the Virtual Mentoring Program

Review of checklists from the SUNY Student Learning Network as a guide for post semester review.

ONLINE COURSE REVIEW CHECKLIST

Review Your Course

Evolve: Evaluate Review and Revise your online course

New Faculty Course Review: Review and Revise

ONLINE COURSE REVIEW CHECKLIST used by mentors/observers in the SUNY SLN

Return to SPS Faculty and Course Development Program [1]

HOME | Resources for Teaching and Learning with Technology)