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From CUNY Academic Commons

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Course Management  Engaging Students

A principle of effective instruction is to engage the learners. There are numerous ways in which this can be attempted as part of the basic instructional design of a course. Some are to be described here.

Student Led Discussions

Explanation: Many have described the use of Student Led Discussion. One proponent is Dr. William Pelz of SUNY.

Resources: How to prepare for and lead discussion. How to teach a course in student-led discussion format. A User’s Manual for Student-Led Discussion by Gale Rhodes and Robert Schaible, Professor of Arts and Humanities, Lewiston-Auburn College http://spdbv.vital-it.ch/TheMolecularLevel/StdLedDisc.html

Cutting the cord: student-led discussion groups in higher education by John Kremer, (The School of Psychology, The Queen’s University of Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland), Carol McGuinness, (The School of Psychology, The Queen’s University of Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=837524&show=abstract

Example– in Philosophy Classes of Dr. Philip A. Pecorino, CUNY, Queensborough Communty College , School of Professional Studies

This is placed at the end of the set of discussions in each module of the course

Module#   Student Led Discussion

Each of you are to submit a new thread with your own discussion topic related to this module of this class. You are to moderate the discussion. Read the following material, if you have not already done so, about student led discussions. It is part of the course information documents under course outline. http://www.qcc.cuny.edu/SocialSciences/ppecorino/SS610/outline-student-lead-discussions.html You are responsible to post and moderate. You are not responsible if others do not respond to your post. When posting make sure you make the SUBJECT line clear. Do not leave it blank. Do not put your name in the subject area

Reflections on Learning

Explanation: Reflection on what one has learned and on the content of instruction are powerful activities supportign and deepening learning and supporting learner motivation.

Resources:

Learning Through Reflection http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/development/reflection.html Hatton & Smith (1995) identified four essential issues concerning reflection: Hatton, N., Smith, D. (1995). Reflection in Teacher Education: Towards Definition and Implementation. The University of Sydney: School of Teaching and Curriculum Studies WWW: http://www2.edfac.usyd.edu.au/LocalResource/Study1/hattonart.html

• We should learn to frame and reframe complex or ambiguous problems, test out various interpretations, and then modify our actions consequently.

• Our thoughts should be extended and systematic by looking back upon our actions some time after they have taken place.

• Certain activities labeled as reflective, such as the use of journals or group discussions following practical experiences, are often not directed towards the solution of specific problems. • We should consciously account for the wider historic, cultural, and political values or beliefs in framing practical problems to arrive at a solution. This is often identified as critical reflection . However, the term critical reflection, like reflection itself, appears to be used loosely, some taking it to mean no more than constructive self-criticism of one’s actions with a view to improvement.

Reflection http://www.intime.uni.edu/model/learning/refl.html

Example-in Philosophy Classes of Dr. Philip A. Pecorino, CUNY, Queensborough Communty College , School of Professional Studies

This is placed at the end of each module as the last discsussion forum

What have the materials and exercises of this module meant to you? How does anything relate to your life? Has your thinking about anything changed in any way? If so, how? If so , why?

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